Connect

Check out the many ways to connect with Premier Paper & Packaging

Blog

The Hidden Side of Digital



Every day we send email, navigate the web and store our videos, photos or music in the Cloud. We often have the impression that the whole process is trivial and nearly free, but this is not at all the case.  So says L’Agence de l’Environnement et de la Maîtrise de l’Énergie (ADEME), an agency of the government of France which, promotes an environmental approach to the workplace and to daily living. In a recent Guide, La Face Cachée de Numérique, (The Hidden Face of Digital),  they describe the widespread environmental impacts of the growing number of digital devices (increasing energy consumption, use of primary minerals, pollution and waste production) and how to reduce them. In the Guide, it is estimated that there are 2 billion smartphones, 1 billion computers, 5 to7 billion other connected devices and 45 billion servers worldwide and that 8.4 billion connected devices would be sold in the world in 2017, 31% more than in 2016. The forecast for 2020 is 50 billion connected devices. In one hour, there are 8 to 10 billion emails sent (not including spam) and 180 million Google searches and the average distance a piece of data travels is 15,000 km. The manufacture of a computer requires 240 kg of fossil fuels, 22 kg of chemicals, 1.5 t of water and numerous precious (gold and platinum) or rare earth (tantalum, lanthanum, neodymium, yttrium) minerals as well as those which are dangerous for the environment (lead, bromine, arsenic, chlorine, mercury and cadmium). A desk top computer will consume between 120 and 250 kWh/year and a cell phone 2 to 7 kWh/year. The Guide has a great deal of practical advice on how to reduce the environmental impact of your electronic habits, starting with carefully choosing what you buy. This includes looking for equipment that carries one of the environmental logos like Energy Star and buying a device that suits your needs and does not contain extra functions that you will never use.  Keeping your device longer and having it repaired rather than replacing it as soon as it breaks down is also better for the environment. They also suggest reducing your energy consumption by turning your computer off when you are done or putting it in sleep mode for short breaks. Almost all parts of an electronic device can be recycled and reused so make sure you dispose of them in an appropriate manner. Don’t keep your old and unused smartphones or laptops stashed in your closet as they contain a wealth of raw materials. According to the Guide, there is 50 times more gold in a tonne of electronic cards than in a tonne of mineral! And some of these materials are toxic and need to be carefully treated. When you send an email, it takes a complicated and lengthy pathway that likely involves more than one data center along the way. Multiplying the number of recipients of an email by ten increases its environmental impact by four. Reducing the number of recipients, not replying to ‘all’ recipients unless necessary, optimizing the size of attachments using compressed files and utilizing USB keys for transferring very large files are just some of the suggestions the Guide makes to limit the energy used by your email. And don’t forget that while the Cloud sounds like it is a virtual space with unlimited storage capacity, it is actually a collection of networks, servers and storage units made up of real hardware and cables which consume a great deal of energy, 24 hours a day. Getting rid of movies, images, music and anything else that is in storage in the Cloud but no longer needed is recommended. Ditto for your personal blogs. Cleaning up emails and unused files on your local device will make it run more efficiently and use less energy.  Consulting data in a file that is stored externally requires a return trip between your computer and a server and sending data over the internet consumes twice the energy as storing it locally for a year. Take home message: store as much of your information on your device as possible. Watching videos on line is highlighted as they represent 60% of internet traffic! When you watch a film, for example, it is better to download it rather than stream it live. Don’t treat your digital devices as though they have no environmental impact because they do! Learning how to minimize the impact is a necessary part of our digital future. To learn more about other interesting paper facts go to www.twosidesna.org


Read More 

7 Deadly Sins of Greenwashing



Greenwashing is the act of misleading consumers regarding the practices of a company or the environmental benefits of a product or service. Manufacturers have noticed this trend and are striving to increase their profit without actually investing in producing sustainable products. According to the UL 2010 Greenwashing Report  there were 73% more products on the market that referred to themselves as "green" than existed the year before. Of those, only 4.5% of the 4744 products examined were completely free of greenwashing. And, Greenpeace International reported in 2012 that greenwashing is alive and well in big business, providing case studies of the companies that spoke in reverent tones about the respect their executives had for the forests they are cutting down... Sad. Perhaps this is because of the effects of climate change or the growth of green building, but the word sustainability is increasingly on our minds. Companies are increasingly using the word "green" and often banking on false information or vagueness to trick consumers into buying products that give the impression that the product is "eco-friendly" or “sustainable.” Since there are few major standards or certifications for sustainable products, it is easy for companies to commit one or more of “the seven sins of greenwashing.” Credit: Institute for Sustainable Communication 1. Sin of the Hidden Trade-off: This sin is committed by suggesting a product is “green” based on a very narrow set of attributes. 2. Sin of No Proof: This is an environmental claim that cannot be substantiated by a third party or by easily accessible information. The supermarket chain known as Woolworths has been marketing their generic tissue brand claiming that “a certified environmentally managed company that is environmentally, socially, and economic responsible” produced the product. There is no information on the product supporting this claim. 3. Sin of Vagueness: When companies use terms that are poorly defined or very broad, the verbiage can mislead consumers. Tyson chicken is a culprit of this type of behavior. They label their chicken as “all natural” even though they are treated with antibiotics, fed GMO corn, and sourced from factory farms. 4. Sin of Irrelevance: Products will often display information that is unimportant or unhelpful in order to sway consumers into purchasing their products. CFCs, the most harmful ozone depleting substance, has been banned for decades, yet insecticides, lubricants and disinfectants still label their products “CFC-Free” to greenwash potential customers. The label is completely irrelevant. 5. Sin of Lesser of Two Evils: Some companies will argue that their product is more environmentally sustainable than other products in the same category. This distracts the consumer from the general sustainability of the entire product category. Some tobacco farmers are growing organic in the hopes of attracting more customers. In fact, American Spirit’s “natural” smokes saw a 10% increase in sales per year for the last decade. These cigarette butts still litter the planet and cause cancer. 6. Sin of Fibbing: The worst sin, but luckily the least frequent are simply false claims. In Canada, two spa retailers, “EcoSmart Spas” and “Dynasty Spas,” were making false claims that their products met the criteria of the ENERGY STAR Program. The companies were slapped with a fine for brazen greenwashing. Theodyssey.com 7. Sin of Worshiping False Labels: Some products allude to a third party endorsement where no such endorsement exists. Companies like Organix, Beauty Pure and Simple, name their product line to give the allure of a toxic free, green material. There is no third party endorsing the product, Organix does in fact include a long list of toxic ingredients. As the green and sustainable trend grows, consumers are becoming more willing to pay for “organic” and “all-natural” products. Manufacturers have noticed this trend and are striving to increase their profit without actually investing in producing sustainable products. To avoid greenwashing, remember “the seven sins” and always read the labels. To read more about the Paper industry, forestry, and greenwashing go to https://www.poplarnetwork.com/news/7-deadly-sins-greenwashing. Blog Source: https://www.poplarnetwork.com/news/7-deadly-sins-greenwashing


Read More 

Fresh and Recycled Paper are Complimentary



Fresh or recycled fiber? The answer is both! Have you ever wondered if it is more sustainable to use paper products made from fresh or recycled fiber? It is a fair question to ask, but a question that cannot be answered with either-or. In fact, fresh and recycled fiber are part of single-integrated wood fiber system. Fresh fiber needs to be harvested to sustain that cycle. Positive impacts and effectiveness of recycling depend on how much usable fiber can be recovered. The environmental attributes of fresh and recycled fiber are difficult to compare because both complement each other in a single system. Why does this matter? Demand for wood and fiber is expected to increase for the foreseeable future. Using natural resources responsibly and transparently is key to meeting this demand. Recovery and recycling is an integral part of using resources efficiently, reducing consumption footprints, providing sustainable products and thereby contributing to creating more sustainable lifestyles. Forests provide us with a renewable and highly recyclable raw material – wood. Fiber obtained from wood is used to make paper and other products. Given resource constraints, the recovery and recycling of wood and paper products are essential to make a resource-efficient, quasi-circular economy a reality. Decisions about the purchase and use of wood, fresh and recycled fiber can have wide-ranging consequences on environmental, social and economic values of forests and other natural resources. Making informed choices is imperative for all businesses in building and retaining consumer confidence in their product offerings, including the use of paper, packaging and other fiber based materials. With this Facts & Trends report the WBCSD Forest Solutions Group (the source found below) aims to demonstrate the complementary of fresh and recycled fiber for the sustainable supply of renewable raw material and products, outline environmental trade-offs between choosing between fresh and recycled fiber and emphasize how to maximize the value of each harvested tree. If you need help deciding what paper, fresh or recycled, is best for your school or office, let us know. We are happy to help you maneuver through the numerous paper characteristics to help you pick the right paper for your projects. You can contact us by filling out our online contact form or calling us at 1-800-320-8970. SOURCE: Developed by the WBCSD Forest Solutions Group with extensive technical support from the National Council for Air and Stream Improvement (NCASI), it supports the ongoing dialogue with major users of forest-based products, in particular consumer-goods companies, WBCSD members and other forest-focused stakeholders in government, civil society and business. It complements the WRI & WBCSD Sustainable Procurement Guide for wood- and paper-based products.


Read More 

Can’t See the Wood for the Trees?…



For many years, International Paper's "Go Paper. Grow Trees." campaign and "Print Grows Trees" operated by the Printing & Graphics Association MidAtlantic have been promoting the vital link between paper / print and the long-term retention of privately-owned (including family-owned) forest lands.  In short, a strong market for pulp, paper, lumber and other forest products, does grow trees. In North America we grow many more trees than we harvest.  Forest area in the U.S. increased by 5,800 NFL football fields per day between 2007 and 2012, or a total of 14 million acres.  In Canada, the forest cover has remained stable over the last two decades and, in recent years, Canada’s actual harvest has been 44% of annual growth. To illustrate the powerful renewable features of well managed North American forests, we calculated how much time it takes to grow some well-known paper products: a standard #10 envelope and a ream of office copy paper (500 sheets).  The results may surprise you! Our calculation methods It is possible to estimate the time needed to grow wood fiber for certain paper products on a given forest area.  The results depend on which tree species are used to make these paper products and the age and growing conditions of the trees.  Soil fertility and moisture, drainage conditions and the number of trees per acre all affect tree growth rate. Tree species also vary widely in their wood density: a higher density wood will produce more fiber for the same weight than a low density wood. The necessary data and fiber growth rate calculations were obtained from the literature for nine tree species used in pulp and paper production and occurring under different growing conditions in the U.S. and Canada.  The objective of this exercise was to develop estimates of the time it takes to grow the wood fiber necessary for the given paper products. Information source: http://www.twosidesna.org/US/Paper-grows-trees..quite-fast


Read More 

The Sustainable Forestry Initiative – What is it?



The Sustainable Forestry Initiative Strategic Vision The future of our forests depends on strengthening the connections between sustainable forests, thriving communities, and responsible purchasing. SFI IS A SOLUTIONS-ORIENTED SUSTAINABILITY ORGANIZATION THAT COLLABORATES ON FOREST-BASED CONSERVATION AND COMMUNITY INITIATIVES THAT DEMONSTRATE AND ENHANCE OUR SHARED QUALITY OF LIFE WHILE PROVIDING SUPPLY CHAIN ASSURANCES THROUGH STANDARDS, DATA, AND AUTHENTIC STORIES. Our collective achievement, of over a quarter billion acres of land certified to the SFI Standard, is only the beginning. These lands, owned and managed by public, private, conservation, indigenous and academic interests, collectively embody a scale of significance to examine and understand changes in working forests and their relationship to larger landscapes. They constitute a living ‘reality lab’ to explore Future Forests. OUR REACH goes even beyond those quarter billion acres to the small landowners we engage through our fiber sourcing standard to broaden the practice of responsible forest management. OUR STANDARDS will be the proof-point for responsible forest management, enabling forests to continue to support robust economies that provide an economic incentive for communities and private landowners to keep forests as forests. OUR GRASSROOTS INFRASTRUCTURE of 34 SFI Implementation Committees across North America fosters community engagement for Future Forests, from educating the next generation through to community building. OUR VOICE, unique amongst our competitors, will speak to a perspective in which responsibly managed productive forests are a mainstay of society’s sustainable infrastructure, complementing landscapes managed for conservation; providing clean air, fresh water and habitat; and supporting sustainable forest-resource- based communities. OUR RESEARCH AND GRANT-MAKING will help our community explore the innovations that will shape the future of our forests and the communities they support. To date that community has invested over $1.5 billion in research through SFI’s standards requirement. SFI will provide insight, thought leadership, research, essential services, and a big tent that will enable this community to envision and achieve this future. We will continue to speak the language of business sustainability, providing brand owners with the assurance, information, tools and examples they need to manage risk while demonstrating that their supply chains generate economic, social and environmental benefits. SFI IS A COMMUNITY, NOT JUST A STANDARD. TOGETHER, THAT COMMUNITY STANDS FOR FUTURE FORESTS – BECAUSE FORESTS AFFECT US ALL. Learn more about the success of the SFI by viewing the 2016 scorecards below! Information source: http://www.sfiprogram.org/


Read More 

Towel and Tissue – Bid Supplier



We are excited to share that we have partnered with Nittany Paper Mills. They are a mill out of PA! Here is a little bit about them and their family-owned operation… Nittany Paper Mills is a family-owned company located in the Appalachian Mountains of Central Pennsylvania with a distribution network that spans across the United States. Their focus is to provide economical workplace solutions with highly renewable paper towels, bath tissue, facial tissue, napkins, and no-touch dispensers. Founded in 2005, Nittany Paper now produces over 100 products to customize customer restrooms, break rooms, and work areas with Green Seal and USDA Certified Products. • They specialize in the most modern USDA Certified Bio-based paper towels and tissue made from bamboo and sugarcane. • Their products range from 1000' roll towels to facial tissue and lunch napkins. We provide touch free towel dispensers for customer convenience as well as small and jumbo bath tissue dispensers. • These products are shipped nationally to distribution centers that service the daily needs of all end using customers on a timely basis. • Nittany is large enough to ship nationally with competitive pricing and small enough to personally assist clients in saving money, while maintaining a high level of quality paper. Nittany is a great company, that we are proud to work with. We use their high quality products, and other products like theirs, for our government, facility, and school bids. Contact us for your custodial paper bids, today! Contact for bids: http://www.premierpaper.com/contact-form/  


Read More 

Natural Choice: Better for the Environment and Your Bottom Line



Natural Choice: Better for the environment and your bottom line. Stop paying a premium to do the right thing. New Natural Choice™ copy paper is the responsible choice for sustainable paper and a sustainable bottom line. Natural Choice Paper™ is made with a process that yields twice as much paper from the same amount of wood, compared to standard copy paper. It’s a cost-effective and conscientious alternative to paying more for paper containing 30 percent recycled fiber. This affordable, environmentally friendly paper is ideal for everyday needs in personal printers, high-speed office laser printers and inkjet copiers. Its high opacity, excellent formation and low curl make it ideal for two-sided printing. So you can save money with a clear conscience. Our sustainability secret NORPAC’s thermo-mechanical pulping process — one of the world’s largest and most efficient — relies primarily on clean steam and physical grinding to separate wood fibers. By contrast, chemical pulping relies on “cooking” the wood in a chemical bath, which then must be washed away — along with a lot of the wood’s organic material. That chemical pulping, used for most recycled-content copy papers, requires more virgin wood chips than the same volume of Natural Choice paper. That’s also how Natural Choice delivers more than twice the yield of standard copy paper. Environmental attributes and paper specifications: Additional copy paper options include Natural Choice 30 and ORCA paper! To learn more visit our Natural Choice webpage! http://www.premierpaper.com/shop/natural-choice-copy-paper/ Interested in using Natural Choice copy paper? Add Premier Paper and Packaging to your school, government, or state bid list! Premier Paper and Packaging 1550 E. Boone Industrial Blvd. Columbia, MO    65202 For pricing information contact bandb@premierpaper.com or dstansberry@premierpaper.com


Read More 

Printing emails can provide a permanent record – Paper is renewable, sustainable and recyclable!



It has become common practice to see emails with misleading footers. Messages, such as "Do you really need to print this email, it will harm the environment" or "Think before you print". Questioning the sustainability of print on paper and should be challenged. Paper is made from wood; a renewable resource. It is one of the most recycled commodities in Europe and a large portion of the energy used to produce paper comes from renewable biomass. Print and Paper can often be the best way to communicate and, if responsibly recycled, is environmentally sustainable. Misleading email footers fail to meet the most basic tests for acceptable environmental messaging as outlined by many Government and advertising authorities. They are not backed by competent and reliable scientific evidence and imply, without evidence, that electronic communication always has less effect on the environment than printed materials. So, if you need a convenient and permanent copy of emails, don't feel guilty about printing but please ensure you recycle. We offer some footers of our own for you to consider: Ensure you choose paper from companies that source fibre from well managed, certified forests. Yes, its ok to print your emails, but please recycle waste paper. Unlike many other products we use, responsibly produced paper comes from a renewable resource. European working forests are good for the environment, providing clean air, clean water, wildlife habitat, and carbon storage. Responsibly produced paper is one of the most recycled products in the world. It is also made from trees a natural and renewable resource. If you print, please recycle. Paper production supports sustainable forest  management. If you print, please recycle. Paper production helps maintain working forests. Thanks to sustainable forest management, the number of trees growing in Europe has increased by 30% in the past 50 years. If you print, please recycle. Responsibly produced paper is one of the most recyclable, renewable and natural forms of communication. If you print, please recycle. Paper is a biodegradable, compostable, and renewable product made from trees. Sustainably managed forests are good for the environment, providing clean air, clean water, wildlife habitat, and carbon storage.


Read More 

NEW: Natural Choice Copy Paper



NORPAC’s latest bid to keep up with a changing market finally has unrolled and Premier Paper and Packaing has it! :) Read more to see how NORPAC is making big moves to change the reputation and perception of the use of copy paper! Premier could not be more excited about the opportunity to supply the U.S. with the latest and greatest in copy paper! At the beginning of the month, North Pacific Paper Co. began offering its new “Natural Choice Paper,” an environmentally friendly office paper. For two years, NORPAC has been testing the product to reduce discoloration typical of ground-wood paper. It is made from a chlorine-free process of grinding wood — namely Douglas firs — into pulp. Craig Anneberg, NORPAC mill manager, said they chose to use Douglas fir because it’s one of the more prominent trees along the I-5 corridor. They’re “aligning the product with a renewable natural resource,” he said. What’s more, twice as much paper can be produced from the same tree, the company said. Unlike chemical pulp — which gets rid of more than half the wood — ground-wood paper has a much higher yield. About 13 cartons of paper can be produced from the average tree via ground-wood, or about 65,000 sheets of paper. Because the ground-wood paper is harder to bleach, the paper might appear darker, but only slightly. NORPAC’s product is at 87 percent brightness, whereas most copy paper is at about 92 percent. Still, Ray Harrison, NORPAC’s fiber line manager, emphasized the environmental benefits of the product. The paper is designed to be recycled, though they’re still working on the process of lowering the ink level of the reused paper. Rolls of the white paper will be made in Longview, then shipped to the Midwest to be cut into smaller sheets and bundled into reams. “The first big run was in late June, so now we’ve got enough to offer in Longview and potential customers in the Midwest and up and down the West Coast,” Harrison said. To learn more visit our Natural Choice webpage! http://www.premierpaper.com/shop/natural-choice-copy-paper/ Interested in using Natural Choice copy paper? Add Premier Paper and Packaging to your school, government, or state bid list! Premier Paper and Packaging 1550 E. Boone Industrial Blvd. Columbia, MO    65202 For pricing information contact bandb@premierpaper.com or dstansberry@premierpaper.com Article source: http://www.norpacpaper.com/natural-choice/


Read More 

Natural Choice – Paper you can feel good about!



One of the most significant energy efficiency projects in recent years is underway in the State of Washington, and it could set the stage for new growth in the U.S. paper industry. The largest paper mill in the U.S., Weyerheuser’s NORPAC plant in Longview, is getting a new system for pretreating wood chips that is expected to save the company 100 million kilowatt hours of electricity per year. The project is noteworthy not only for its sheer size, but also for demonstrating the potential that new conservation technologies have for generating new products and services. The full system is not entirely on line yet, but NORPAC (North Pacific Paper Corporation) is already using it to produce a new grade of paper. Mining energy efficiency for new power NORPAC is jointly owned by Weyerhaeuser and Japan’s Nippon Paper Industries. It is the single largest industrial consumer of electricity in Washington State, and it is a thirsty customer. By itself, it accounts for about 40 percent of the demand on the local utility, the Cowlitz County Public Utility District. NORPAC has been the beneficiary of Washington’s rich hydropower resources, but with existing hydropower at or near its limits, under conventional practices the only way for NORPAC to grow would be for the utility to purchase additional power from other more costly sources. New energy efficiency technologies essentially provide a new source of power at a lower cost, which benefits both the utility and NORPAC over the long run. NORPAC also stands to achieve immediate benefits from a sharp reduction in its annual electricity costs. New cutting-edge energy efficiency technology Paper making is a centuries-old craft that has evolved over time, but energy efficiency has not been a particularly critical part of that evolution. Now global competition and razor-thin margins give the edge to companies that can cut costs to the bone, and the spotlight is on energy consumption. Preparing raw wood chips to be pulped is one energy-intensive first step in paper making, and this is the process addressed by new system. Called the Chip Pretreatment Interstage Screen Project, it involves two main components. As described by writer Andre Stepankowsky of The Daily News, one component of NORPAC’s makeover is a new bleaching phase. That system has been completed, and it has enabled NORPAC to lower energy costs and reduce its use of bleaching chemicals to boot. Despite the reduced use of chemicals, the new technology has resulted in a whiter, brighter grade of paper that NORPAC is already marketing as a new product under the name Norbrite 92. The other component will provide the bulk of the energy savings. Still under construction, it consists of fine-meshed cylindrical screens made in Finland. When finished, it will shave about 15 percent off the amount of secondary grinding needed to fully pulp the wood chips. Weyerhaeuser and sustainability The new project apparently represents the first time these screens have been applied to a commercial installation of this scale, so the endeavor does involve some element of risk for Weyerhaeuser. The local utility and the Bonneville Power Administration provided significant financial support but Weyerhaeuser still took on $35 million in financing, out of a total of $60 million. However, the risk is a calculated one given Weyerhaeuser’s growing track record on sustainability, which includes more than two dozen recent awards and recognitions. Weyerhaeuser’s 2011 sustainability progress report covers 43 targets for 2020. Among other achievements, the company notes that it has reduced its greenhouse gas emissions by 31 percent compared to a 2000 baseline, putting it on track to achieve its 2020 goal of a 40 percent reduction. Water conservation, employee engagement and a green building program for the company’s homebuilding subsidiaries are some of the other highlights for 2011. In addition to giving Weyerhaeuser a running start on its 2012 sustainability report, if the new NORPAC energy efficiency project delivers on its promises, it could be replicated at any number of paper mills in the U.S. and beyond. To learn more visit our Natural Choice webpage! http://www.premierpaper.com/shop/natural-choice-copy-paper/ Interested in using Natural Choice copy paper? Add Premier Paper and Packaging to your school, government, or state bid list! Premier Paper and Packaging 1550 E. Boone Industrial Blvd. Columbia, MO    65202 For pricing information contact bandb@premierpaper.com or dstansberry@premierpaper.com Article source: http://www.triplepundit.com/2012/08/weyerheuser-norpac-energy-efficiency/


Read More